How to Calculate and Solve for Magnetic Flux Density or Field Induction | The Calculator Encyclopedia

The image above represents the magnetic flux density/field induction.

To compute the magnetic force of a field, four essential parameters are needed and the parameters are Magnetic Force (F), Quantity of Charge (q), Average Velocity of the Charge (v) and Angle between v and B (θ).

The formula for calculating the magnetic flux density/field induction:

B = F / qVsinθ

Where;
B = Magnetic Induction or Magnetic Flux Density
F = Magnetic Force
q = Quantity of Charge
v = Average Velocity of the charge
θ = Angle between v and B

Let’s solve an example;
Find the magnetic flux density/field induction of a field when Magnetic Force (F) is 17, Quantity of Charge (q) is 21, Average Velocity of the Charge (v) is 15 and Angle between v and B (θ) is 120°.

This implies that;
F = Magnetic Force = 17
q = Quantity of Charge = 21
v = Average Velocity of the charge = 15
θ = Angle between v and B = 120°

B = F / qVsinθ
B = 17 / (21 x 15)(sin 120°)
B = 17 / (315)(0.866)
B = 17 / (272.79)
B = 0.0623

Therefore, the magnetic flux density/field induction is 0.0623 Tesla.

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for Magnetic Flux Density or Field Induction | The Calculator Encyclopedia

How to Calculate and Solve for the Current, Time and Quantity of Charge | Nickzom Calculator

The image above represents the quantity of charge.

To compute the quantity of charge, two essential parameters are needed and the parameters are current (I) and time (t).

The formula for calculating the quantity of charge;

Q = It

Where;
Q = Quantity of Charge
I = Current
t = Time

Let’s solve an example;
Find the quantity of charge when the current (I) is 24 amp with a time of 8 secs.

This implies that;
I = Current = 24 amp
t = Time = 8 secs

Q = It
Q = 24 x 8
Q = 192

Therefore, the quantity of charge is 192 coulombs (C).

Calculating the Current (I) of a charge using the Quantity of Charge (Q) and the time (t).

I = Q / t

Where;
I = Current
Q = Quantity of the charge
t = Time

Let’s solve an example;
Find the current of a charge with the quantity of the charge as 150 coulombs (C) and time as 15 secs.

This implies that;
Q = Quantity of the charge = 150 C
t = Time = 15 secs

I = Q / t
I = 150 / 15
I = 10

Therefore. the current is 10 Ampere (A).

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for the Current, Time and Quantity of Charge | Nickzom Calculator

How to Calculate and Solve for Magnetic Force | Nickzom Calculator

The image above represents magnetic force.

To compute the magnetic force of a field, four essential parameters are needed and the parameters are Quantity of Charge (q), Average Velocity of the Charge (v), Magnetic Field Induction or Magnetic Flux Density (B) and Angle between v and B (θ).

The formula for calculating the magnetic force:

F = qVBsinθ

Where;
F = Magnetic Force
q = Quantity of Charge
v = Average Velocity of the Charge
B = Magnetic Field Induction or Magnetic Flux Density
θ = Angle between v and B

Let’s solve an example;
Find the magnetic force of a field when the Quantity of Charge (q) is 11, Average Velocity of the Charge (v) is 20, Magnetic Field Induction or Magnetic Flux Density (B) is 17 and Angle between v and B (θ) is 28°.

This implies that;
q = Quantity of Charge = 11
v = Average Velocity of the Charge = 20
B = Magnetic Field Induction or Magnetic Flux Density = 17
θ = Angle between v and B = 28°

F = qVBsinθ
F = 11 x 20 x 17 x sin28°
F = 11 x 20 x 17 x 0.469
F = 1755.82

Therefore, the magnetic force is 1755.82 Newton (N).

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for Magnetic Force | Nickzom Calculator

How to Calculate and Solve for Escape Velocity | The Calculator Encyclopedia

The image above represents the escape velocity.

To compute the escape velocity of a field, two essential parameters are needed and the parameters are acceleration due to gravity (g) and radius (r).

The formula for calculating the escape velocity:

V = √(2gR)

Where;
V = Escape velocity
g = Acceleration due to gravity
R = Radius

Let’s solve an example;
Find the escape velocity of a field when the acceleration due to gravity is 12 and the radius is 24 cm.

This implies that;
g = Acceleration due to gravity = 12
r = Radius = 24 cm

V = √(2gR)
V = √(2 x 12 x 24)
V = √(576)
V = 24

Therefore, the escape velocity is 24 m/s.

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for Escape Velocity | The Calculator Encyclopedia

How to Calculate and Solve for Gravitational Potential | The Calculator Encyclopedia

The image above represents the Gravitational potential.

To compute the gravitational potential of a field, two essential parameters are needed which are mass (m) and radius (r).

The formula for calculating the gravitational potential;

V = (Gm) / r

Where;
V = Gravitational potential
m = Mass
r = Radius

Let’s solve an example;
Find the gravitational potential of a field when the mass is 14 cm with a radius of 9 cm.

This implies that;
m = Mass = 14 cm
r = Radius = 9 cm

V = (Gm) / r
V = (6.67 x 10-11 x 14) / 9
V = 1.0375e-10 / 9
V = 1.0375e-10

Therefore, the gravitational potential is 1.0375e-10 Volts (V).

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for Gravitational Potential | The Calculator Encyclopedia

How to Calculate and Solve for Gravitational Force | The Calculator Encyclopedia

The image above represents the gravitational force.

To compute the gravitational force of a field, three parameters are needed and this parameters are mass (m1), mass (m2) and radius between the masses (R).

The formula for calculating the gravitational force:

F = Gm1m2 /

Where;
F = Gravitational force
m1 = Mass 1
m2 = Mass 2
r = Radius between the masses

Let’s solve an example;
Find the gravitational force of a field when the mass 1 is 8 cm, mass 2 is 10 cm and the radius between masses is 14 cm.

This implies that;
m1 = Mass 1 = 8 cm
m2 = Mass 2 = 10 cm
r = Radius between the masses = 14 cm

F = Gm1m2 /
F = (6.67 x 10-11 x 8 x 10) / 196
F = 5.336e-9 / 196
F = 2.722e-11

Therefore, the gravitational force is 2.722e-11 Newton (N).

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for Gravitational Force | The Calculator Encyclopedia

The Calculator Encyclopedia Calculates and Solves the Wavelength for a Wave – Particle Behaviour

According to Wikipedia,

Wave–particle duality is the concept in quantum mechanics that every particle or quantum entity may be partly described in terms not only of particles, but also of waves.

In physics, the wavelength is the spatial period of a periodic wave—the distance over which the wave’s shape repeats.

Nickzom Calculator requires two parameters to compute the wavelength of a wave or particle. These parameters are:

  • Mass
  • Velocity

The formula for computing the wavelength is:

λ = h / mv

Where:
λ = Wavelength
h = Planck’s Constant (6.63 x 10-34 js)
m = Mass
v = Velocity

Let’s solve an example, find the wavelength of a wave – particle with a mass of 300 Kg and a velocity of 3 x 1010 m/s.

From the example, we can see that:
m = 300
v = 3 x 1010

λ = 6.63 x 10-34 / 300 (3 x 1010)
λ = 6.63 x 10-34 / 9 x 1012
λ = 7.37 x 10-47

Therefore, the wavelength of the wave – particle (λ) is 7.37 x 10-47.

Continue reading The Calculator Encyclopedia Calculates and Solves the Wavelength for a Wave – Particle Behaviour

How to Calculate the Resultant of Two Vectors (Physics)

According to Math Warehouse,

The resultant vector is the vector that ‘results’ from adding two or more vectors together.

The formula for calculating the resultant of two vectors is:

R = √[P2 + Q2 + 2PQcosθ]

Where:
R = Resultant of the Two Vectors
P = Magnitude of the First Vector
Q = Magnitude of the Second Vector
θ = Inclination Angle between the Two Vectors

Let’s solve an example, find the resultant of two vectors where the first vector has a magnitude of 30 and the second vector has a magnitude of 40 with 50° has the inclination between the two vectors.

From the example above, we can see that P is 30, Q is 40 and θ is 50. Now, inserting these values into the formula we compute for the resultant of the two vectors.

R = √[(30)² + (40)² + 2(30)(40) . cos50°]
R = √[900 + 1600 + 2(1200) . (0.6427876096865394)]
R = √[900 + 1600 + 2400(0.6427876096865394)]
R = √[900 + 1600 + 1542.6902632476945]
R = √[4042.6902632476945]
R = 63.58215365373915

Therefore, the resultant of the two vectors is 63.58215365373915.

To be able to get the resultant of two vectors using Nickzom Calculator. You need to know the magnitude of the two vectors and the inclination between the two vectors.

Continue reading How to Calculate the Resultant of Two Vectors (Physics)

How to Calculate and Solve for Linear Expansivity, Area Expansivity and Volume or Cubic Expansivity

Linear expansivity, area expansivity and volume or cubic expansivity are all parameters that are being governed by heat energy. All three parameter is dependent on temperature rise which is primarily in Celsius unit of temperature.

Linear expansivity additionally depends on the original length and final length, area expansivity additionally depends on the original area and final area and lastly, cubic or volume expansivity depends on the original volume and final volume.

The formula for calculating linear expansivity is (l2 – l1) / l1θ
l2 represents the final length.
l1 represents the original length.
θ represents the temperature rise in Celsius.

The formula for calculating area expansivity is (A2 – A1) / A1θ
A2 represents the final area.
A1 represents the original area.
θ represents the temperature rise in Celsius.

The formula for calculating volume or cubic expansivity is (V2 – V1) / V1θ
V2 represents the final volume.
V1 represents the original volume.
θ represents the temperature rise in Celsius.

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for Linear Expansivity, Area Expansivity and Volume or Cubic Expansivity

How to Calculate the Mechanical Advantage of a Machine (Physics)

Mechanical advantage is a very important parameter of machines and is considered a lever problem.

Mechanical advantage is the ratio of load to effort.

Nickzom Calculator – The Calculator Encyclopedia solves for mechanical advantage alongside a bunch of other problems in Physics.

For Example: Let’s calculate mechanical advantage of a machine when the load is 200 N and the effort is 120 N.

Mechanical Advantage = Load / Effort

Load = 200 N

Effort = 120 N

Mechanical Advantage = 200 / 120 = 1.6667

Therefore, the mechanical advantage of the machine is 1.6667.

Continue reading How to Calculate the Mechanical Advantage of a Machine (Physics)