How to Calculate and Solve for Sensitivity Drift Co-efficient | System Performance Characteristics

The image above represents sensitivity drift co-efficient.

To compute for sensitivity drift co-efficient, two essential parameters are needed and these parameters are Sensitivity Drift (SD) and Change in Temperature (ΔT).

The formula for calculating for sensitivity drift co-efficient:

CSD = SD / ΔT

Where:

CSD = Sensitivity Drift Co-efficient
SD = Sensitivity Drift
ΔT = Change in Temperature

Let’s solve an example;
Find the sensitivity drift co-efficient when the sensitivity drift is 28 and the change in temperature is 12.

This implies that;

SD = Sensitivity Drift = 28
ΔT = Change in Temperature = 12

CSD = SD / ΔT
CSD = 28 / 12
CSD = 2.33

Therefore, the sensitivity drift co-efficient is 2.33.

Calculating for the Sensitivity Drift when the Sensitivity Drift Co-efficient and the Change in Temperature is Given.

SD = CSD x ΔT

Where:

SD = Sensitivity Drift
CSD = Sensitivity Drift Co-efficient
ΔT = Change in Temperature

Let’s solve an example;
Find the sensitivity drift when the sensitivity drift co-efficient is 25 and the change in temperature is 6.

This implies that;

CSD = Sensitivity Drift Co-efficient = 25
ΔT = Change in Temperature = 6

SD = CSD x ΔT
SD = 25 x 6
SD = 150

Therefore, the sensitivity drift is 150.

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for Sensitivity Drift Co-efficient | System Performance Characteristics

How to Calculate and Solve for Sensitivity Drift | System Performance Characteristics

The image above represents sensitivity drift.

To compute for sensitivity drift, two essential parameters are needed and these parameters are Drift of Higher Temperature (DT1and Drift of Lower Temperature (DTo).

The formula for calculating sensitivity drift:

S.D = DT1 – DTo

Where:

S.D = Sensitivity Drift
DT1 = Drift at Higher Temperature
DTo = Drift at Lower Temperature

Let’s solve an example;
Find the sensitivity drift when the drift at higher temperature is 44 and the drift at lower temperature is 11.

This implies that;

DT1 = Drift at Higher Temperature = 44
DTo = Drift at Lower Temperature = 11

S.D = DT1 – DTo
S.D = 44 – 11
S.D = 33

Therefore, the sensitivity drift is 33.

Calculating for the Drift at Higher Temperature when the Sensitivity Drift and the Drift at Lower Temperature is Given.

DT1 = S.D + DTo

Where;

DT1 = Drift at Higher Temperature
S.D = Sensitivity Drift
DTo = Drift at Lower Temperature

Let’s solve an example;
Find the drift at higher temperature when the sensitivity drift is 20 and the drift at lower temperature is 18.

This implies that;

S.D = Sensitivity Drift = 20
DTo = Drift at Lower Temperature = 18

DT1 = S.D + DTo
DT1 = 20 + 18
DT1 = 38

Therefore, the drift at higher temperature is 38.

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for Sensitivity Drift | System Performance Characteristics

How to Calculate and Solve for Drift | System Performance Characteristics

The image above represents drift.

To compute for drift, two essential parameters are needed and these parameters are New Reading (RNand Initial Reading (RO).

The formula for calculating drift:

D = RN – RO

Where:

D = Drift
RN = New Reading
RO = Initial Reading

Let’s solve an example;
Find the drift when the new reading is 55 and the initial reading is 15.

This implies that;

RN = New Reading = 55
RO = Initial Reading = 15

D = RN – RO
D = 55 – 15
D = 40

Therefore, the drift is 40.

Calculating for the New Reading when the Drift and the Initial Reading is Given.

RN = D + RO

Where:

RN = New Reading
D = Drift
RO = Initial Reading

Let’s solve an example;
Find the new reading when the drift is 34 and the initial reading is 10.

This implies that;

D = Drift = 34
RO = Initial Reading = 10

RN = D + RO
RN = 34 + 10
RN = 44

Therefore, the new reading is 44.

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for Drift | System Performance Characteristics

How to Calculate and Solve for Zero Drift | System Performance Characteristics

The image above represents zero drift.

To compute for zero drift, two essential parameters are needed and these parameters are Drift (D) and Change in Temperature (ΔT).

The formula for calculating zero drift:

ZD = D / ΔT

Where:

ZD = Zero Drift
D = Drift
ΔT = Change in Temperature

Let’s solve an example;
Find the zero drift when drift is 40 and the change in temperature is 22.

This implies that;

D = Drift = 40
ΔT = Change in Temperature = 22

ZD = D / ΔT
ZD = 40 / 22
ZD = 1.81

Therefore, the zero drift is 1.81.

Calculating for the Drift when the Zero Drift and the Change in Temperature is Given.

D = ZD x ΔT

Where:

D = Drift
ZD = Zero Drift
ΔT = Change in Temperature

Let’s solve an example;
Find the drift when the zero drift is 28 and the change in temperature is 14.

This implies that;

ZD = Zero Drift = 28
ΔT = Change in Temperature = 14

D = ZD x ΔT
D = 28 x 14
D = 392

Therefore, the drift is 392.

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for Zero Drift | System Performance Characteristics

How to Calculate and Solve for Sensitivity | System Performance Characteristics

The image above represents sensitivity.

To compute for sensitivity, two essential parameters are needed and these parameters are Deflection (D) and Change in Measurand (ΔM).

The formula for calculating sensitivity:

S = D / ΔM

Where:

S = Sensitivity
D = Deflection
ΔM = Change in Measurand

Let’s solve an example;
Find the sensitivity when the deflection is 30 and the change in measurand is 14.

This implies that;

D = Deflection = 30
ΔM = Change in Measurand = 14

S = D / ΔM
S = 30 / 14
S = 2.142

Therefore, the sensitivity is 2.142.

Calculating for the Deflection when the Sensitivity and the Change in Measurand is Given.

D = S x ΔM

Where:

D = Deflection
S = Sensitivity
ΔM = Change in Measurand

Let’s solve an example;
Find the deflection when the sensitivity is 20 and the change in measurand is 8.

This implies that;

S = Sensitivity = 20
ΔM = Change in Measurand = 8

D = S x ΔM
D = 20 x 8
D = 160

Therefore, the deflection is 160.

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for Sensitivity | System Performance Characteristics

How to Calculate and Solve for Percentage Error for Full Scale | System Performance Characteristics

The image above represents percentage error for full scale.

To compute for percentage error for full scale, two essential parameters are Error (E) and Maximum Scale Value (MSV).

The formula for calculating percentage error for full scale:

%E = E / MSV x 100%

Where:

%E = Percentage Error for full scale
E = Error
MSV = Maximum Scale Value

Let’s solve an example;
Find the percentage error for full scale when the error is 20 and the maximum scale value is 12.

This implies that;

E = Error = 20
MSV = Maximum scale Value = 12

%E = E / MSV x 100%
S = 20 / 12 x 100%
S = 1.66 x 100%
S = 166.6

Therefore, the percentage error for full scale is 166.6%.

Calculating for the Error when the Percentage Error for Full Scale and the Maximum Scale Value is Given.

E = %E x MSV / 100%

Where:

E = Error
%E = Percentage Error for Full Scale
MSV = Maximum Scale Value

Let’s solve an example;
Find the error when the percentage error for full scale is 30 and the true value is 10.

This implies that;

%E = Percentage Error for full scale = 30
MSV = Maximum Scale Value = 10

E = %E x MSV / 100%
E = 30 x 10 / 100%
E = 300 / 100%
E = 3

Therefore, the error is 3%.
Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for Percentage Error for Full Scale | System Performance Characteristics

How to Calculate and Solve for Percentage Error at any Point on the Instrument | System Performance Characteristics

The image above represents percentage error at any point on the instrument.

To compute for percentage error at any point on the instrument, two essential parameters are Error (E) and True Value (TV).

The formula for calculating percentage error at any point on the instrument:

%E = E / TV x 100%

Where:

%E = Percentage Error at any point on the Instrument
E = Error
TV = True Value

Let’s solve an example;
Find the percentage error at any point on the instrument when the error is 45 and the true value is 25.

This implies that;

E = Error = 45
TV = True Value = 25

%E = E / TV x 100%
S = 45 / 25 x 100%
S = 1.8 x 100%
S = 180

Therefore, the percentage error at any point on the instrument is 180%.

Calculating for the Error when the Percentage Error at any Point on the Instrument and the True Value is Given.

E = %E x TV / 100%

Where:

E = Error
%E = Percentage Error at any Point on the Instrument
TV = True Value

Let’s solve an example;
Find the error when the percentage error at any point on the instrument is 32 and the true value is 12.

This implies that;

%E = Percentage Error at any Point on the Instrument = 32
TV = True Value = 12

E = %E x TV / 100%
E = 32 x 12 / 100%
E = 384 / 100%
E = 3.84

Therefore, the error is 3.84%.
Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for Percentage Error at any Point on the Instrument | System Performance Characteristics

How to Calculate and Solve for Error | System Performance Characteristics

The image above represents error.

To compute for error, two essential parameters are needed and these parameters are Indicated Value and True Value.

The formula for calculating error:

E = I.V – T.V

Where:

E = Error
I.V = Indicated Value
T.V = True Value

Let’s solve an example;
Find the error when the indicated value is 22 and the true value is 10.

This implies that;

I.V = Indicated Value = 22
T.V = True Value = 10

E = I.V – T.V
E = 22 – 10
E = 12

Therefore, the error is 12.

Calculating for Indicated Value when the Error and the True Value is Given.

I.V = E + T.V

Where;

I.V = Indicated Value
E = Error
T.V = True Value

Let’s solve an example;
Find the indicated value where the error is 32 and the true value is 15.

This implies that;

E = Error = 32
T.V = True Value = 15

I.V = E + T.V
I.V = 32 + 15
I.V = 47

Therefore, the indicated value is 47.

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for Error | System Performance Characteristics

How to Calculate and Solve for Total Load on Flexible Pipe | Irrigation Water Requirement

The image above represents total load on flexible pipe.

To compute for total load on flexible pipe, three essential parameters are needed and these parameters are Load Co-efficient for Ditch Conduits (Cd), Unit Weight of Fill Material (w), Outside Diameter of the Conduit (Bc) and Width of Ditch at Top of Conduit (Bd).

The formula for calculating Total Load on Flexible Pipe:

Wc = CdwBcBd

Where:

Wc = Total Load on Flexible Pipe
Cd = Load Co-efficient for Ditch Conduits
w = Unit Weight of Fill Material
Bc = Outside Diameter of the Conduit
Bd = Width of Ditch at Top of Conduit

Let’s Solve an example;
Find the total load on flexible pipe when the load co-efficient for ditch conduits is 3, the unit weight of fill material is 5, the outside diameter of the conduit is 7 and width of ditch at top of conduit is 5.

This implies that;

Cd = Load Co-efficient for Ditch Conduits = 3
w = Unit Weight of Fill Material = 5
Bc = Outside Diameter of the Conduit = 7
Bd = Width of Ditch at Top of Conduit = 5

Wc = CdwBcBd
Wc = (3)(5)(7)(5)
Wc = 525

Therefore, the total load on flexible pipe is 525.

Calculating for the Load Co-efficient for Ditch Conduits when the Total Load on Flexible Pipe, the Unit Weight of Fill Material, Outside Diameter of the Conduit and the Width of Ditch at Top of Conduit is Given.

Cd = Wc / w x Bc x Bd

Where;

Cd = Load Co-efficient for Ditch Conduits
Wc = Total Load on Flexible Pipe
w = Unit Weight of Fill Material
Bc = Outside Diameter of the Conduit
Bd = Width of Ditch at Top of Conduit

Let’s Solve an example;
Find the load co-efficient for ditch conduits when the total load on flexible pipe is 40, the unit weight of fill material is 4, the outside diameter of the conduit is 6 and the Width of ditch at top of conduit is 2.

This implies that;

Wc = Total Load on Flexible Pipe = 40
w = Unit Weight of Fill Material = 4
Bc = Outside Diameter of the Conduit = 6
Bd = Width of Ditch at Top of Conduit = 2

Cd = Wc / w x Bc x Bd
Cd = 40 / 4 x 6 x 2
Cd = 40 / 48
Cd = 0.83

Therefore, the load co-efficient for ditch conduits is 0.83.

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for Total Load on Flexible Pipe | Irrigation Water Requirement

How to Calculate and Solve for Turbine Stiffness (Correction Factor) | Irrigation Water Requirement

The image above represents turbine stiffness.

To compute for turbine stiffness (correction factor), two essential parameters are needed and these parameters are Correction Factor for Radius of Curvature with Deflection (c) and Parallel Plate Stiffness for Tubing (σp).

The formula for calculating turbine stiffness:

σ = 0.149c[σp]

Where:

σ = Turbine Stiffness
c = Correction Factor for Radius of Curvature with Deflection
σp = Parallel Plate Stiffness for Tubing

Let’s solve an example;
Find the turbine stiffness when the correction factor for radius of curvature with deflection is 15 and the parallel plate stiffness for tubing is 3.

This implies that;

c = Correction Factor for Radius of Curvature with Deflection = 15
σp = Parallel Plate Stiffness for Tubing = 3

σ = 0.149c[σp]
σ = 0.149(15)[3]
σ = 6.705

Therefore, the turbine stiffness is 6.705.

Calculating for the Correction Factor for Radius of Curvature with Deflection when the Turbine Stiffness and the Parallel Plate Stiffness for Tubing is Given.

c = σ / 0.149 x σp

Where;

c = Correction Factor for Radius of Curvature with Deflection
σ = Turbine Stiffness
σp = Parallel Plate Stiffness for Tubing

Let’s solve an example;
Find the correction factor for radius of curvature with deflection when the turbine stiffness is 32 and the parallel plate stiffness for tubing is 8.

This implies that;

σ = Turbine Stiffness = 32
σp = Parallel Plate Stiffness for Tubing = 8

c = σ / 0.149 x σp
c = 32 / 0.149 x 8
c = 32 / 1.192
c = 26.84

Therefore, the correction factor for radius of curvature with deflection is 26.84.

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for Turbine Stiffness (Correction Factor) | Irrigation Water Requirement