How to Calculate and Solve for the Average Pressure of a Reservoir Fluid Flow | The Calculator Encyclopedia

The above image represents the reservoir fluid.

To compute for the reservoir fluid, two essential parameters are needed and these parameters are External pressure (Peand Flowing Bottom-Hole Pressure (Pwf).

The formula for calculating the average pressure of the reservoir fluid:

P* = √[Pe² + Pwf² / 2]

Where;

P* = Average Pressure
Pe = External Pressure
Pwf = Flowing Bottom-Hole Pressure

Let’s solve an example;
Find the average pressure of a reservoir fluid with an external pressure of 19 and Flowing bottom-hole pressure is 15.

This implies that;

Pe = External Pressure = 19
Pwf = Flowing Bottom-Hole Pressure = 15

P* = √[Pe² + Pwf² / 2]
P* = √[19² + 15² / 2]
P* = √[361 + 225 / 2]
P* = √[586 / 2]
P* = √[293]
P* = 17.117

Therefore, the average pressure is 17.117 psi;.

Calculating the External Pressure when the Average Pressure and the Flowing Button-Hole Pressure is Given.

Pe = √[[P* x 2]² – Pwf²]

Where;

Pe = External Pressure
P* = Average Pressure
Pwf = Flowing Bottom-Hole Pressure

Let’s solve an example;
Find the external pressure of a reservoir fluid with an average pressure of 24 and Flowing bottom-hole pressure is 16.

This implies that;

P* = Average Pressure = 24
Pwf = Flowing Bottom-Hole Pressure = 16

Pe = √[[P* x 2]² – Pwf²]
Pe = √[[24 x 2]² – 16²]
Pe = √[2048]
Pe = 45.25

Therefore, the external pressure is 45.25.

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for the Average Pressure of a Reservoir Fluid Flow | The Calculator Encyclopedia

How to Calculate and Solve for a Well Drainage Area | Nickzom Calculator

The image above represents well drainage area.

To compute for the well drainage area, three essential param xeters are needed and these parameters are Total Area of Field (AT), Well Flow Rate (qwand Field Flow Rate (qr).

The formula for calculating the well drainage area:

Aw = Ar[qw / qr]

Where;

Aw = Well Drainage Area
AT = Total Area of Field
qw = Well Flow Rate
qr = Field Flow Rate

Let’s solve an example;
Find the well drainage area when the total area of field is 11, well flow rate is 9 and the field flow rate is 6.

This implies that;

AT = Total Area of Field = 11
qw = Well Flow Rate = 9
qr = Field Flow Rate = 6

Aw = AT[qw / qr]
Aw = 11[9/6]
Aw = 11[1.5]
Aw = 16.5

Therefore, the well drainage area is 16.5 ft². 

Calculating the Total Area of Field when Well Drainage Area, Well Flow Rate and Field Flow Rate is Given.

AT = Aw (qr / qw)

Where;
AT = Total Area of Field
Aw = Well Drainage Area
qw = Well Flow Rate
qr = Field Flow Rate

Let’s solve an example;
Find the total area of field when the well drainage area is 32, well flow rate is 11 and the field flow rate is 14.

This implies that;
Aw = Well Drainage Area = 32
qw = Well Flow Rate = 11
qr = Field Flow Rate = 14

AT = Aw (qr / qw)
AT = 32 (14 / 11)
AT = 32 (1.272)
AT = 40.704

Therefore, the total area of field is 40.704.

Calculating the Field Flow Rate when Well Drainage Area, Total Area of Field and Well Flow Rate is Given.

qr = qw (Ar / Aw)

Where;
qr = Field Flow Rate
AT = Total Area of Field
Aw = Well Drainage Area
qw = Well Flow Rate

Let’s solve an example;
Find the field flow rate when the well drainage area is 42, total area of field is 32 and the well flow rate is 24.

This implies that;
Aw = Well Drainage Area = 42
AT = Total Area of Field = 32
qw = Well Flow Rate = 24

qr = qw (AT / Aw)
qr = 24 (32 / 42)
qr = 24 (0.7619)
qr = 18.285

Therefore, the Field Flow Rate is 18.285.

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for a Well Drainage Area | Nickzom Calculator

RE: Passion, Purpose and Duty

On a bright Saturday afternoon of November, 2013 I had just finished doing my chores. I was very tired and just wanted to relax with my very entertaining soccer video game. Yes, I am a FIFA guy, FIFA 14 was hot and I was killing the tournament. I was at the finals of the tournament and there was so much pride, joy and contentment at the level I reached on the very tough game.

As I was about to start the finals match, I heard a knock on my door. Behold, it was my younger sister. She always came to me to help her solve her mathematics problems or assignments. She always complained that the teachers are doing magic when it comes to solving math and she gets lost in the steps. I noticed that after a while of helping her that the teachers do skip some steps when solving the math problem assuming that the students know them but alas most do not.

I have already started the game and I decided to joggle the both activities since the math problem she brought was on quadratic equation which is very simple for me as a second year engineering student. In the process of helping her understand how to use the almighty quadratic formula I was scored twice before half time and at half time I was able to have come back with a goal making it 1–2 (Me Versus Computer). I still pressed forward to the next half and along the way I was scored again and I was so angry. I ignored my sister to focus on just the game to know if I could come back. But I was only able to come back with a goal and the finals ended as 2–3 with me losing the tournament. I was so pissed off. I yelled! My sister on the hand was sad I did not aid her understand how to solve her math problem. She left the room unsatisfied.

In the midst of my vex I wished in my mind that there was something like a calculator encyclopedia that she can always use whenever she has a math problem just like a dictionary. No one would disturb you to tell you the meaning of a word. You simply tell them to go and check their dictionary and that’s all. I thought why is there nothing like that for calculations? Continue reading RE: Passion, Purpose and Duty

How to Calculate and Solve for Reservoir Radius and Well Spacing | The Calculator Encyclopedia

The image above represents the reservoir radius.

To compute for the reservoir radius, one essential parameter is needed and this parameter is Well Spacing (A).

The formula for calculating the reservoir radius:

re = √[43560A  / π]

Where;

re = Reservoir Radius
A = Well Spacing

Let’s solve an example;
Given that the well spacing of an reservoir radius is 42. Find the reservoir radius?

This implies that;

A = Well Spacing = 42

re = √[43560A  / π]
re = √[43560 x 42 / π]
re = √[1829520 / π]
re = √582354.3
re = 763.12

Therefore, the reservoir radius is 763.12 ft.

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for Reservoir Radius and Well Spacing | The Calculator Encyclopedia

How to Calculate and Solve for Radial Flow Rate in Reservoir Fluid Flow | The Calculator Encyclopedia

The image above represents the radial flow rate.

To compute for the radial flow rate, eight essential parameters are needed and these parameters are External Pressure (Pe), Flowing Bottom-Hole Pressure (Pwf), Formation Thickness (h), Oil Viscosity (μo ), Permeability (k), Oil Formation Volume Factor (Bo), Drainage Radius (reand Well Bore Radius (rw ).

The formula for calculating the radial flow rate:

Qo = 0.00708kh[Pe – Pwf] / μo Bo In[re / rw]

Where;

Qo = Radial Flow Rate
Pe = External Pressure
Pwf = Flowing Bottom-Hole Pressure
h = Formation Thickness
μo = Oil Viscosity
k = Permeability
Bo = Oil Formation Volume Factor
re = Drainage Radius
rw = Well Bore Radius

Let’s solve an example;
Find the radial flow rate when the External Pressure is 14, Flowing Bottom-Hole Pressure is 21, Formation Thickness is 7, Oil Viscosity is 35, Permeability is 50, Oil Formation Volume Factor is 13, Drainage Radius is 26 and Well Bore Radius is 15.

This implies that;

Pe = External Pressure = 14
Pwf = Flowing Bottom-Hole Pressure = 21
h = Formation Thickness = 7
μo = Oil Viscosity = 35
k = Permeability = 50
Bo = Oil Formation Volume Factor = 13
re = Drainage Radius = 26
rw = Well Bore Radius = 15

Qo = 0.00708kh[Pe – Pwf] / μo Bo In[re / rw]
Qo = 0.00708 x 50 x 7 [14 – 21] / 35 x 13 In[26 / 15]
Qo = 0.00708 x 50 x 7 [-7] / 35 x 13 In[26 / 15]
Qo = 0.00708 x 50 x 7 [-7] / 35 x 13 In[1.73]
Qo = 0.00708 x 50 x 7 [-7] /35 x 13 x 0.55
Qo = 2.478 [-7] / 35 x 13 x 0.55
Qo = -17.346 / 250.27
Qo = -0.069

Therefore, the radial flow rate is -0.069 STB/day.

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for Radial Flow Rate in Reservoir Fluid Flow | The Calculator Encyclopedia

How to Calculate and Solve for Linear Flow Rate in Reservoir Fluid Flow | The Calculator Encyclopedia

The image above represents the linear flow rate.

To compute for the linear flow rate, four parameters are needed and these parameters are Initial pressure (P1), Final Pressure (P2), Thickness (h) and Permeability (k).

The formula for calculating linear flow rate:

q = 0.001127kh[P1 – P2]

Where:
q = Linear Flow Rate
P1 = Initial Pressure
P2 = Final Pressure
h = Thickness
k = Permeability

Let’s solve an example;
Find the linear flow rate when the initial pressure is 12, final pressure is 22, thickness is 18 and permeability is 44.

This implies that;
P1 = Initial Pressure = 12
P2 = Final Pressure = 22
h = Thickness = 18
k = Permeability = 44

q = 0.001127kh [P1 – P2]
q = 0.001127 x 44 x 18 [12 – 22]
q = 0.001127 x 44 x 18 [-10]
q = 0.892584 [-10]
q = -8.92584

Therefore, the linear flow rate is -8.92584 bbl/day.

Calculating Permeability when the linear flow rate, Initial Pressure, Final Pressure and Thickness is Given.

k = q / 0.001127h (p1 – p2)

Where;
k = Permeability
q = Linear Flow Rate
P1 = Initial Pressure
P2 = Final Pressure
h = Thickness

Let’s solve an example;
Find the permeability when the initial pressure is 34, final pressure is 24, thickness is 12 and linear flow rate is 50.

This implies that;
q = Linear Flow Rate = 50
P1 = Initial Pressure = 34
P2 = Final Pressure = 24
h = Thickness = 12

k = q / 0.001127h (p1 – p2)
k = 50 / 0.001127h (34 – 24)
k = 50 / 0.001127h (10)
k = 50 / 0.01127
k = 4436.5

Therefore, the permeability is 4436.5.

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for Linear Flow Rate in Reservoir Fluid Flow | The Calculator Encyclopedia

How to Calculate and Solve for Fluid Potential, Pressure, Datum Level and Density | The Calculator Encyclopedia

The image above represents the fluid potential.

To compute for the fluid potential, three essential parameters are needed and these parameters are pressure (P), Datum Levels (ΔZ) and Density (ρ).

The formula for calculating fluid potential:

φ = P – [ρ / 144]ΔZ

Where;
φ = Fluid Potential
P = Pressure
ΔZ = Datum Levels
ρ = Density

Let’s solve an example;
Find the fluid potential when the pressure is 24 with a datum level of 18 and the density of 30.

This implies that;
P = Pressure = 24
ΔZ = Datum Levels = 18
ρ = Density = 30

φ = P – [ρ / 144]ΔZ
φ = 24 – [30/144] 18
φ = 24 – [0.2083] 18
φ = 24 – 3.75
φ = 20.25

Therefore, the fluid potential is 20.25.

Calculating the Pressure(P) when the fluid potential, Datum levels and Density is Given.

P = φ – [ρ / 144]ΔZ

Where;
P = Pressure
φ = Fluid Potential
ΔZ = Datum Levels
ρ = Density

Lets solve an example;
Find the pressure with a fluid potential of 40 and a datum levels of 18 with density of 24.

This implies that;
φ = Fluid Potential = 40
ΔZ = Datum Levels = 18
ρ = Density = 24

P = φ – [ρ / 144]ΔZ
P = 40 – [24 / 144]18
P = 40 – [0.167]18
P = 40 – 3
P = 37

Therefore, the pressure is 37.

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for Fluid Potential, Pressure, Datum Level and Density | The Calculator Encyclopedia

How to Calculate and Solve for True Stress | The Calculator Encyclopedia

The image above represents the true stress.

To compute for the true stress, two essential parameters are needed and these parameters are force (F) and instantaneous area (Ai).

The formula for calculating true stress:

σT = F / Ai

Where;
T = True Stress
F = Force
Ai = Instantaneous Area

Let’s solve an example;
Find the true stress when the instantaneous area is 60 with a force of 25.

This implies that;
F = Force = 25
Ai = Instantaneous Area = 60

σT = F / Ai
σT = 25 / 60
σT = 0.416

Therefore, the true stress is 0.416 Pa.

Calculating the Force when True Stress and Instantaneous Area is Given.

F = Ai x σT

Where;
F = Force
σT = True Stress
Ai = Instantaneous Area

Let’s solve an example;
Find the force when the instantaneous area is 30 with a true stress of 15.

This implies that;
σT = True Stress = 15
Ai = Instantaneous Area = 30

F = Ai x σT
F = 30 x 15
F = 450

Therefore, the force is 450.

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for True Stress | The Calculator Encyclopedia

How to Calculate and Solve for Maximum Velocity to avoid Overturning of a Vehicle moving along a Level Circular Path | The Calculator Encyclopedia

The image above represents the maximum velocity to avoid overturning of a vehicle moving along a level circular path.

To compute for the maximum velocity, four essential parameters are needed and these parameters are Acceleration due to Gravity (g), Height of Centre of Gravity of the Vehicle from Ground Level (h), Radius of Circular Path (r) and Half of the Distance between the Centre Lines of the Wheel (a).

The formula for calculating the maximum velocity:

vmax = √(gra / h)

Where:
vmax = Maximum Velocity to avoid Overturning of a Vehicle moving along a Level Circular Path
g = Acceleration due to Gravity
h = Height of Centre of Gravity of the Vehicle from Ground Level
r = Radius of Circular Path
a = Half of the Distance between the Centre Lines of the Wheel

Let’s solve an example;
Find the maximum velocity when the Acceleration due to Gravity (g) is 10.2, Height of Centre of Gravity of the Vehicle from Ground Level (h) is 14, Radius of Circular Path (r) is 22 and Half of the Distance between the Centre Lines of the Wheel (a) is 32.

This implies that;
g = Acceleration due to Gravity = 10.2
h = Height of Centre of Gravity of the Vehicle from Ground Level = 14
r = Radius of Circular Path = 22
a = Half of the Distance between the Centre Lines of the Wheel = 32

vmax = √(gra / h)
vmax = √((10.2)(22)(32)/14)
vmax = √((7180.79)/14)
vmax = √(512.91)
vmax = 22.647

Therefore, the maximum velocity to avoid Overturning of a Vehicle moving along a Level Circular Path is 22.647 m/s.

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for Maximum Velocity to avoid Overturning of a Vehicle moving along a Level Circular Path | The Calculator Encyclopedia

How to Calculate and Solve for the Reaction at the Inner Wheel of a Vehicle moving along a Level Circular Path | The Calculator Encyclopedia

The image represents reaction at the inner wheel of a vehicle moving along a level circular path.

To compute for the reaction, six essential parameters are needed and these parameters are Mass of the Vechicle (m), Acceleration due to Gravity (g), Velocity of the Vehicle (v), Height of Centre of Gravity of the Vehicle from Ground Level (h), Radius of Circular Path (r) and Half of the Distance between the Centre Lines of the Wheel (a).

The formula for calculating the reaction at the inner wheel of a vehicle moving along a level circular path:

RA = mg / 2[1 – v²h / gra]

Where:
RA = Reaction at the Inner Wheel of a Vehicle moving along a Level Circular Path
m = Mass of the Vechicle
g = Acceleration due to Gravity
v = Velocity of the Vehicle
h = Height of Centre of Gravity of the Vehicle from Ground Level
r = Radius of Circular Path
a = Half of the Distance between the Centre Lines of the Wheel

Let’s solve an example;
Find the reaction when Mass of the Vechicle (m) is 13, Acceleration due to Gravity (g) is 9.8, Velocity of the Vehicle (v) is 11, Height of Centre of Gravity of the Vehicle from Ground Level (h) is 5, Radius of Circular Path (r) is 7 and Half of the Distance between the Centre Lines of the Wheel (a) is 3.

This implies that;
m = Mass of the Vechicle = 13
g = Acceleration due to Gravity = 9.8
v = Velocity of the Vehicle = 11
h = Height of Centre of Gravity of the Vehicle from Ground Level = 5
r = Radius of Circular Path = 7
a = Half of the Distance between the Centre Lines of the Wheel = 3

RA = mg / 2[1 – v²h / gra]
RA = 13(9.8) / 2[1 – (11)²(5) / (9.8)(7)(3)]
RA = 127.4 / 2[1 – (121)(5) / 205.8]
RA = 63.7[1 – 605 / 205.8]
RA = 63.7[1 – 2.939]
RA = 63.7[-1.939]
RA = -123.56

Therefore, the reaction at the inner wheel of a vehicle moving along a level of circular path is -123.56 N.

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for the Reaction at the Inner Wheel of a Vehicle moving along a Level Circular Path | The Calculator Encyclopedia