How to Calculate and Solve for Impulse | Motion

The image above represents impulse.

To compute for impulse, two essential parameters are needed and these parameters are force (f) and time (t).

The formula for calculating impulse:

I = Ft

Where;

I = Impulse
F = Force
t = Time

Let’s solve an example;
Given that the force is 28 and the time is 14. Find the impulse?

This implies that;

F = Force = 28
t = Time = 14

I = Ft
I = 28 x 14
I = 392

Therefore, the impulse is 392 Ns.

Calculating the Force when the Impulse and the Time is Given.

F = I / t

Where;

F = Force
I = Impulse
t = Time

Let’s solve an example;
Given that the impulse is 60 and the time is 10. Find the force?

This implies that;

I = Impulse = 60
t = Time = 10

F = I / t
F = 60 / 10
F = 6

Therefore, the force is 6 N.

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for Impulse | Motion

How to Calculate and Solve for Final Velocity | Motion

The image above represents final velocity.

To compute for final velocity, three essential parameters are needed and these parameters are initial velocity (u), acceleration (a) and time (t).

The formula for calculating final velocity:

v = u + at

Where;

v = Final Velocity
u = Initial Velocity
a = Acceleration
t = Time

Let’s solve an example;
Find the Final velocity when the initial velocity is 12, acceleration is 9 and the time is 24.

This implies that;

u = Initial Velocity = 12
a = Acceleration = 9
t = Time = 24

v = u + at
v = 12 + (9 x 24)
v = 12 + 216
v = 228

Therefore, the final velocity is 228 m/s.

Calculating the Initial Velocity when the Final Velocity, the Acceleration and the Time is Given.

u = v – at

Where;

u = Initial Velocity
v = Final Velocity
a = Acceleration
t = Time

Let’s solve an example;
Find the Initial Velocity when the Final Velocity is 32, the acceleration is 12 and the time is 2.

This implies that;

v = Final Velocity = 32
a = Acceleration = 12
t = Time = 2

u = v – at
u = 32 – (12 x 2)
u = 32 – 24
u = 8

Therefore, the initial velocity is 8 m/s.

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for Final Velocity | Motion

How to Calculate and Solve for Acceleration | Motion

The image above represents acceleration.

To compute for acceleration, three essential parameters are needed and these parameters are initial velocity (u), final velocity (v) and time (t).

The formula for calculating acceleration:

a = (v – u) / t

Where;

a = Acceleration
v = Final Velocity
u = Initial Velocity
t = Time

Let’s solve an example;
Find the acceleration when the final velocity is 21, the initial velocity is 10 and time is 8.

This implies that;

v = Final Velocity =21
u = Initial Velocity = 10
t = Time = 8

a = (v – u) / t
a = (21 – 10) / 8
a = 11 / 8
a = 1.375

Therefore, the acceleration is 1.375 m/s².

Calculating the Initial Velocity when the Acceleration, the Final Velocity and the Time is Given.

u = v – at

Where;

u = Initial Velocity
a = Acceleration
v = Final Velocity
t = Time

Let’s solve an example;
Find the initial velocity when the acceleration is 14, the final velocity is 34 and the time is 2.

This implies that;

a = Acceleration = 14
v = Final Velocity = 34
t = Time = 2

u = v – at
u = 34 – (14 x 2)
u = 34 – 28
u = 6

Therefore, the initial velocity is 6 m/s.

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for Acceleration | Motion

How to Calculate and Solve for Distance Covered | Motion

The image above represents distance covered.

To compute for distance covered, three essential parameters are needed and these parameters are initial velocity (u), acceleration (a) and time (t).

The formula for calculating distance covered:

S = ut + 0.5at²

Where;

S = Distance Covered
u = Initial Velocity
t = Time
a = Acceleration

Let’s solve an example;
Find the distance covered when the initial velocity is 21, acceleration is 10 and the time is 15.

This implies that;

u = Initial Velocity = 21
t = Time = 15
a = Acceleration = 10

S = ut + 0.5at²
S = (21 x 15) + (0.5 x 10 x 15²)
S = 315 + (0.5 x 10 x 225)
S = 315 + (1125)
S = 1440

Therefore, the distance covered is 1440 m .

Calculating the Initial Velocity when the Distance Covered, the Acceleration and the Time is Given.

u = S – 0.5at2 / t

Where;

u = Initial Velocity
S = Distance Covered
t = Time
a = Acceleration

Let’s solve an example;
Find the initial velocity when the distance covered is 48 with a time of 8 and an acceleration of 9.

This implies that;

S = Distance Covered = 48
t = Time = 8
a = Acceleration = 9

u = S – 0.5at2 / t
u = 48 – 0.5(9)(82) / 8
u = 48 – 0.5(9)(64) / 8
u = 48 – 288 / 8
u = – 240 / 8
u = – 30

Therefore, the initial velocity is – 30 m/s.

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for Distance Covered | Motion

How to Calculate and Solve for Distance Covered | Motion

The image above represents distance covered.

To compute for distance covered, three essential parameters are needed and these parameters are final velocity (v), initial velocity (u) and time (t).

The formula for calculating distance covered:

S = ((u + v) / 2) t

Where;

S = Distance Covered
u = Initial Velocity
v = Final Velocity
t = Time

Let’s solve an example;
Find the distance covered when the initial velocity is 6, final velocity is 11 and time is 14.

This implies that;

u = Initial Velocity = 6
v = Final Velocity = 11
t = Time = 14

S = ((u + v) / 2) t
S = ((6 + 11) / 2) 14
S = ((17) / 2) 14
S = (8.5) 14
S = 119

Therefore, the distance covered is 119 m.

Calculating the Initial Velocity when the Distance Covered, the Final Velocity and the Time is Given.

u = (2S / t) – v

Where;

u = Initial Velocity
S = Distance Covered
v = Final Velocity
t = Time

Let’s solve an example;
Find the initial velocity when the distance covered is 48, the final velocity is 20 and the time is 4.

This implies that;

S = Distance Covered = 48
v = Final Velocity = 20
t = Time = 4

u = (2S / t) – v
u = (2(48) / 4) – 20
u = (96 / 4) – 20
u = 24 – 20
u = 4

Therefore, the initial velocity is 4 m/s.

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for Distance Covered | Motion

How to Calculate and Solve for the Radius of Investigation in Well Testing | The Calculator Encyclopedia

The image above represents radius of investigation.

To compute for the radius of investigation, five essential parameters are needed and these parameters are permeability (k), porosity (φ), viscosity (μ), time (t) and total compressibility (CT).

The formula for calculating the radius of investigation:

rinv = 0.0325 √[Kt / φμCT]

Where:

rinv = Radius of Investigation
K = Permeability
φ = Porosity
μ = Viscosity
t = Time
CT = Total Compressibility

Let’s solve an example;
Find the radius of investigation when the permeability is 25, porosity is 18, viscosity is 12, time is 22 and total compressibility is 37.

This implies that;

K = Permeability = 25
φ = Porosity =18
μ = Viscosity = 12
t = Time = 22
CT = Total Compressibility = 37

rinv = 0.0325 √[Kt / φμCT]
rinv = 0.0325 √[25 x 22 / 18 x 12 x 37]
rinv = 0.0325 √[25 x 22 / 7992]
rinv = 0.0325 √[550 / 7992]
rinv = 0.0325 √[0.068]
rinv = 0.0325 [0.26]
rinv = 0.0085

Therefore, the radius of investigation is 0.0085 ft.

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for the Radius of Investigation in Well Testing | The Calculator Encyclopedia

How to Calculate and Solve for the Current, Time and Quantity of Charge of an Electrolysis | The Calculator Encyclopedia

The image above represents the quantity of charge.

To compute for the quantity of charge, two essential parameters are needed and these parameters are current (I) and time (T).

The formula for calculating the quantity of charge:

Q = It

Where;
Q = Quantity of charge
I = Current
T = Time

Let’s solve an example;
Find the quantity of charge with a current of 24 and time of 12.

This implies that;
I = Current = 24
T = Time = 12

Q = It
Q = 24 x 12
Q = 288

Therefore, the quantity of charge is 288 Coulombs (C).

Calculating the Current (I) using the Quantity of Charge and Time.

I = Q / t

Where;
I = Current
Q = Quantity of charge
T = Time

Let’s solve an example;
Given that the quantity of charge is 240 with a time of 14. Find the Current?

This implies that;
Q = Quantity of charge = 240
T = Time = 14

I = Q / t
I = 240 / 14
I = 17.14

Therefore, the current is 17.14 ampere.

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for the Current, Time and Quantity of Charge of an Electrolysis | The Calculator Encyclopedia

How to Calculate and Solve for the Current, Time and Quantity of Charge | Nickzom Calculator

The image above represents the quantity of charge.

To compute the quantity of charge, two essential parameters are needed and the parameters are current (I) and time (t).

The formula for calculating the quantity of charge;

Q = It

Where;
Q = Quantity of Charge
I = Current
t = Time

Let’s solve an example;
Find the quantity of charge when the current (I) is 24 amp with a time of 8 secs.

This implies that;
I = Current = 24 amp
t = Time = 8 secs

Q = It
Q = 24 x 8
Q = 192

Therefore, the quantity of charge is 192 coulombs (C).

Calculating the Current (I) of a charge using the Quantity of Charge (Q) and the time (t).

I = Q / t

Where;
I = Current
Q = Quantity of the charge
t = Time

Let’s solve an example;
Find the current of a charge with the quantity of the charge as 150 coulombs (C) and time as 15 secs.

This implies that;
Q = Quantity of the charge = 150 C
t = Time = 15 secs

I = Q / t
I = 150 / 15
I = 10

Therefore. the current is 10 Ampere (A).

Continue reading How to Calculate and Solve for the Current, Time and Quantity of Charge | Nickzom Calculator

Calculating Compound Interest Using Nickzom Calculator

Using the Nickzom Calculator for Math calculations is quite simple. Navigation through any of the App platforms from Mobile to Web is quite easy. Just a bit of playing around and you’re quite comfortable with the user interface. Does Math seem hard, Nickzom Calculator makes it easier.

We will consider Compound Interest, how your Principal, Interest and Amount can easily be calculated using the Nickzom calculator. The platform  also goes a long way in showing the formula used, and the steps it took to arrive at its answer.

 

Compound Interest

Compound Interest being a very popular topic in Mathematics entails basically  Principal, Rate, Interest, Time (number of years) and expected amount. The Nickzom Calculator can carry out calculations on Compound Interest, solving problems on

Continue reading Calculating Compound Interest Using Nickzom Calculator

How to Calculate and Apply Simple Interest, Principal, Rate and Time

What is Simple Interest?

Simple interest is a method of calculating the interest charge on a loan or bill. Simple interest is determined by multiplying the interest rate by the principal by time which is normally in years (per annual) but could be in months, days, weeks etc during the specified time frame.

Simple Interest (S.I.) = (P x r x t) / 100

Where P stands for Principal, r stands for interest rate and t stands for time.

How to Solve and Apply Simple Interest.

There are a number of different reasons that could make one want to carry out a simple interest operation. One of them being that you want to lend money to your friend to start a business and you want your money to work for you and reproduce during the course of the loan.

Continue reading How to Calculate and Apply Simple Interest, Principal, Rate and Time